Futurism

In a stylistic idiom that integrated some of the techniques of Cubism and Divisionism, the Futurists glorified the energy and speed of modern life together with the dynamism and violence of the new technological society. In their manifestos, art, poetry, and theatrical events, they celebrated automobiles, airplanes, machine guns, and other phenomena that they associated with modernity; they denounced moralism and feminism, as well as museums and libraries, which they considered static institutions of an obsolete culture. The Futurists sought to represent the experience of the modern metropolis—namely, the overstimulation of the individual’s sensorium—by portraying multiple phases of motion simultaneously and by showing the interpenetration of objects and their environment through the superimposition of different chromatic planes.

Luigi Russolo The Revolt 1911; Collection: Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague  © The Estate of Luigi Russolo

Luigi Russolo
The Revolt 1911; Collection: Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague 
© The Estate of Luigi Russolo

Source: http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/collect...