Edward Rice (photographed by Jerry Siegel)

Edward Rice (photographed by Jerry Siegel)

Born and raised in North Augusta, SC in 1953, Edward Rice began to show an interest in art at a young age, taking note early on of the creative nuances of architectural design. After studying at Augusta College and the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art in Augusta, GA, Rice started his own teaching career, becoming director and artist-in-residence at the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art. Choosing to focus more on his own artistic expression, Rice left his teaching position, making his name known with his paintings of largely Southern, vernacular American architecture. His recent focus on cupolas, notably those native to Charleston, SC, display his attention to detail as he creates close-up views of sections of his subjects. These paintings present a balance between simple and complex, calm and intense, reveling in a realistic quality and acting as documents of architectural history, giving a sense of personality to the buildings. 

Edward Rice is the recipient of many awards, including the South Carolina Arts Commission Artist Fellowship and the National Endowment for the Arts / Southern Arts Federation Regional Fellowship. His work has been exhibited throughout the country, including locations such as the Babcock Galleries, New York; Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe; and Heath Gallery, Atlanta. His paintings also reside in the permanent collections of the Gibbes Museum of Art, the Columbia Museum of Art, the South Carolina State Museum, the Greenville County Museum of Art, the Georgia Museum of Art, the Morris Museum of Art, and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Rice currently maintains his studio in North Augusta, SC.


 “His painterly skills, combined with the instincts of a serious architectural historian, have combined to create a body of work that is noteworthy for its elegance, precision, and devotion to the telling detail. His depiction of the obvious and the forgotten, the historic and generic—the often overlooked—is more than a simple architectural record. These images haunt the imagination and mirror the lost architecture of the Old South. They preserve a sense of self as much as they do a sense of Southern history.”

    - Kevin Grogan, The Morris Museum of Art